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PRME Working Group on Climate Change and Environment

Bringing climate change into the classroom with En-ROADS: the Climate Action Simulation and the En-ROADS Climate Workshop

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23 February, 2022 12:00 PM CET

Bringing climate change into the classroom with En-ROADS: the Climate Action Simulation and the En-ROADS Climate Workshop


The atmosphere is heated. Fifty students are negotiating loudly and gesticulating wildly as they try to limit temperature increases to below 2°C by 2100 - while considering the interests of their own and other delegations. Here, students play the Climate Action Simulation, the award-winning simulation-based role-play of the UN climate negotiations based on the En-ROADS climate solutions simulator. En-ROADS, co-developed by Climate Interactive and the MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative, is grounded in state-of-the-art climate and energy science, is fully documented and freely available. Users are enabled to discover the impact of climate actions on the climate-energy system for themselves. Workshop participants will be introduced to En-ROADS and its latest developments. They will jointly and interactively develop a climate scenario together and learn about the two interactive modes of intervention, the En-ROADS Climate Workshop and the Climate Action Simulation.

The workshop will be delivered by Dr. Florian Kapmeier, Professor for Strategy at ESB Business School of Reutlingen University, Germany, and a long-term and close partner of Climate Interactive. He is co-author of many of the recent publications on En-ROADS. He is among the top 5 facilitators of En-ROADS, and has facilitated sessions with groups between 12 to 200 people, from high-school and university students over policy makers to CEOs