Signatories

Details for Walden University

Participant Status

Basic

Type of Organization

University

Type of Education

Undergraduate, Post Graduate, Doctoral, Executive

Institution is part of

Laureate Education, Inc.

Location

Minneapolis, MN, United States

Website

http://www.waldenu.edu

Sign Up Date to PRME

13 Oct 2014

Current Sharing Information on Progress Report Submission

25 Sep 2018

Sharing Information on Progress (2018)

Walden University SIP Report 2018 - View Report

Period Covered: Oct 2016 to Sep 2018

Walden University SIP Report 2018

Achievements Curriculum Integration in the Field of Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability

Walden University continues to integrate corporate responsibility and sustainability in a number of venues:
• Organizational—Walden University participates in community-based projects that make a difference in the civic life of those communities and reflects on the ethical and societal implications of such activities for educational institutions.
• Curriculum—Walden’s social change philosophy is richly embedded in its programs. Walden defines positive social change as a deliberate process of creating and applying ideas, strategies, and actions to promote the worth, dignity, and development of individuals, communities, organizations, institutions, cultures, and societies. Positive social change results in the improvement of human and social conditions. This definition of positive social change provides an intellectually comprehensive and socially constructive foundation for the programs, research, professional activities, and products created by the Walden academic community. Walden’s continuous improvement initiatives are in line with this innovative social change commitment. The educational Values and Mission of Walden University were guided by the same beliefs that are listed as the Six Principles of PRME. Through Walden’s Academic Program Reviews process, conducted for each business program every 5 years, significant emphasis on sustainable management continues to be added.
• Faculty and Staff—A number of Walden’s faculty members research extensively in the area of corporate responsibility and sustainability. Other faculty members have set agendas for researching, presenting, publishing, and developing teaching materials in areas reflecting the PRME Principles. The university supports faculty research by providing a stipend to encourage faculty to publish and present at academic conferences.


• Students—Walden University continues to encourage students to be future generators of sustainable value for business and society. This includes focus on motivation and inspiration to become a qualified sustainable leader in the area of business. This initiative is also reflected within our international relations. The evolving curriculum in sustainable management will be central to these initiatives.

Organizational
Walden’s social change mission is embedded in its formal vision, mission, goals, and university outcomes and is distinguished by its mission of effecting positive social change. Walden supports positive social change through the development of principled, knowledgeable, and ethical scholar-practitioners who are and who will become civic and professional role models by advancing the betterment of society. Walden’s social change philosophy is richly embedded in its program outcomes and courses, in which Walden defines positive social change as a deliberate process of creating and applying ideas, strategies, and actions to promote the worth, dignity, and development of individuals, communities, organizations, institutions, cultures, and societies. This definition of positive social change provides an intellectually comprehensive and socially constructive foundation for the programs, research, professional activities, and products created by the Walden academic community. The Walden mission, vision, and outcomes serve as the foundation or all program and course development.
Mission
Walden University provides a diverse community of career professionals with the opportunity to transform themselves as scholar-practitioners so that they can effect positive social change.
Vision
Walden University envisions a distinctively different 21st-century learning community where knowledge is judged worthy to the degree that it can be applied by its graduates to the immediate solutions of critical societal challenges, thereby advancing the greater global good.
University Outcomes

Walden University strives to produce graduates with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to:
I. Facilitate positive social change where they work, in their communities, and in society.
II. Use their knowledge to positively impact their profession, communities, and in society.
III. Demonstrate a commitment to lifelong learning.
IV. Apply their learning to specific problems and challenges in their workplace and professional settings.
V. Demonstrate information literacy.*
*Information literacy is defined as the ability to know when there is a need for information, and being able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively use that information for the issue or problem at hand.
VI. Demonstrate an understanding of the methods of inquiry used in their professional or academic field.
VII. Practice legal and ethical integrity in their professional work.
VIII. Effectively communicate their ideas and the rationale behind them to others.
IX. Support diversity and multiculturalism within their profession, communities, and society.

Moreover, the School of Management mission, vision, and outcomes serve as an additional framework by which programs and courses maintain a focus on sustainability and corporate responsibility.
Mission
To educate students to think critically and to create or apply knowledge of management for the benefit of society and individuals.
Vision
To be recognized as a 21st-century leader in management higher education to influence social change and societal advances.
Curriculum
The School of Management strives to produce graduates with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to:
1. Use discipline-specific practices within a culturally diverse and/or global context. (IV, IX)
2. Integrate systems thinking in a global context. (II)
3. Employ critical thinking skills to identify, analyze, and develop potential solutions to complex organizational problems. (II)
4. Practice ethical decision making to promote individual and organizational well-being. (VII)
5. Apply effective collaboration techniques within organizations. (VIII)
6. Apply discipline-specific knowledge to improve individual and organizational performance and opportunities. (II, V, VI)
7. Contribute to positive social change through their work with organizations and in society. (I)
8. Communicate effectively in multiple and diverse environments. (VIII)
9. Actively seek opportunities for personal and professional growth. (III).
10. Lead to create mutually beneficial organizational outcomes. (I, VIII)
The School of Management program learning outcomes provide more specific guidance related to the knowledge, skills, and abilities graduates are expected to have upon graduation. These learning outcomes are mapped to the student’s learning experience in the classroom. Listed below are examples of the School of Management’s program outcomes related to sustainability and corporate responsibility.
M.S. in Accounting
At the end of this program, students will be able to:
• Communicate effectively about accounting and business practices, demonstrating knowledge of and respect for a variety of audiences.
• Evaluate accounting and business practices from ethical, legal, and regulatory perspectives, considering diverse stakeholders and competing interests.
• Evaluate opportunities accounting professionals have to promote sustainable, socially aware organizations.


M.S. in Management
At the end of this program, students will be able to:
• Formulate sustainable solutions to practical management problems encountered in a complex global environment by synthesizing relevant data and information and applying systems thinking to problem solving.
• Assess opportunities to improve and sustain organizational performance through strategic thinking, the development of human capital, the allocation of physical resources, and the management of financial resources.

M.S. in Leadership
At the end of the program, students will be able to:
• Students will formulate strategies for organizational or community growth and success that promote accountability, sustainability, mutual respect, and diversity among constituents.

M.S. in Human Resources
At the end of this program, students will be able to:
• Assess opportunities to improve and sustain organizational performance through strategic thinking and management, the development of human capital, and the allocation of physical and financial resources.
• Propose systematic, systemic, and sustainable solutions to complex business problems related to human capital and human resources needs and issues, by applying critical-thinking and analytical skills.

Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA)
At the end of this program, students will be able to:
• Demonstrate the ability to make decisions that are ethical and socially responsible within a global business context.

Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)
At the end of this program, students will be able to:
• Make decisions within a business context that are effective, well-reasoned, ethical, and socially responsible.


Doctor of Business Administration (D.B.A.)
At the end of this program, students will be able to:
• Explain their ethical responsibilities as a member of the business community and citizens in society

School of Management programs further elaborate on the importance of sustainability and corporate responsibility in courses. Listed below are examples of School of Management courses that specifically incorporate content related to sustainability and corporate responsibility.
• EMBA 6100 - Capstone: Business Strategy for Sustainable Competitive Advantage
• WMBA 6990 - Capstone: Sustainable Business Practices and Strategies
• MMSL 6100 - The Character of Leadership
• MMSL 6110 - Building Organizational Culture: Leaders as Architects
• MMSL 6900 - Capstone in Leadership: The Social Impact Vision and Project
• MMSL 6530 - Toward Sustainable Futures: Leadership in Complex, Crisis-Driven Environments
• DDBA 8161 - Business Strategy and Innovation for Competitive Advantage
• MGMT 8420 - Challenging Conventional Leadership
• MGMT 8440 - The Socially Conscious Leader

All of the School of Management undergraduate and graduate programs have a learning outcome component related to ethics. Students will need to master these learning outcomes in order to graduate from their respective program. These ethical course outcomes deal extensively with corporate responsibility issues. The M.B.A. capstone course includes topics such as corporate social responsibility and stakeholder management, while the M.S. in Accounting program requires all students to take a course in legal and ethical issues in accounting.
Learning outcomes for the School of Management programs support Walden’s commitment to producing graduates equipped to adhere to high legal and ethical standards. In Walden’s undergraduate programs, students will analyze ethical issues that impact business decisions from economic, political, legal, and social perspectives,” among other outcomes. Students in the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) and Master of Science specialty programs (M.S. Accounting, M.S. Communications, etc.) will demonstrate ethical, legal, and responsible behavior; and explain the broader role that business has in society and their own responsibilities as a member of the business community and citizens in society. Students in the Ph.D. in Management program will be prepared to articulate the evolution of the field of management and its relationship to human and societal development and design effective and ethical research that addresses identified gaps in the body of knowledge in management and related fields.
Walden University and the College of Management foster legal and ethical behavior on the part of administrators, faculty members, and students by promoting such behavior at several levels:
• University vision, mission, and goals
• University outcomes
• University policies and supporting processes
• College vision and mission
• Program learning outcomes
• Course outcomes
The university’s vision, mission, and goals provide a foundation for legal and ethical behavior through their focus on producing graduates who are agents of positive social change. The university promotes faculty and student engagement in its social change mission in all of its academic programs as well as through university-wide initiatives.

Faculty and Staff
University-provided fellowships and grants to support faculty research activity are awarded each year on a competitive basis. These include the following awards:
• Research Fellowship in Distance Education.
• Fellowship in Research and Applications for Social Change
• Faculty Research Initiative Grant Program
• The David A. Wilson Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
• Research Dissemination Support Program
Walden collects and reports data on the impact of its positive social change mission at the program, college, and university levels. It does so through its annual student, graduate, and faculty surveys, and through reporting of Walden Service Network activity. A few highlights from the 2011Alumni Survey include:
• Well over 90% of graduates responded that their program emphasized social change
• Over 94% of students selected “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” that they personally endorse Walden’s commitment to positive social change.

A number of Walden’s faculty members perform research extensively in the area of corporate responsibility and sustainability. Other faculty members have set agendas for researching, presenting, publishing, and developing teaching materials in areas reflecting the PRME Principles. The university supports faculty research by providing a stipend to encourage faculty members to publish and present at academic conferences.
University-provided fellowships and grants to support faculty research activity are awarded each year on a competitive basis. These include the following:
The university details its expectations, policies, and supporting processes regarding legal and ethical behavior in its handbooks for faculty members and students. Walden provides all administrators and faculty members with a comprehensive Faculty Handbook that summarizes their rights, roles, and responsibilities at the university; conveys the high standards of academic and professional practice expected; and gives faculty members the practical information they need as a Walden University faculty member. Walden regularly updates the Faculty Handbook and posts its most recent version on the online faculty portal. Faculty members are required to sign an electronic form acknowledging they have been provided with and have reviewed the Faculty Handbook at the time of their initial hiring and again on each subsequent revision of the handbook.

Research Fellowship in Distance Education
o Supports research endeavors that contribute both theoretical and applied knowledge to the growing field of distance education; encourages research conducted in the name of the university and continuous improvement in the distance-education programs at Walden.
o Open to: Walden faculty members (employed for at least 2 years) and master’s and doctoral students.
o Award: Up to $10,000.
Fellowship in Research and Applications for Social Change
o Established to enable members of the Walden community to make a significant and meaningful change in academic and social communities, both locally and globally.
o Open to: Walden faculty members (employed for at least 2 years) and master’s and doctoral students.
o Award: Up to $10,000.
Faculty Research Initiative Grant Program
o Established to support excellence in scholarly work by providing funding for selected faculty research projects deemed to be of exceptional merit and is intended to provide “seed money” for the development of faculty research agendas. This program’s funds can be used to support pilot research projects and small-scale research studies and to supplement new areas of investigation that are spin-off studies or sub-studies of larger ongoing research projects.
o Open to: Walden faculty members (employed for at least 6 months).
o Award: Varies.
The David A. Wilson Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
o Seeks to recognize and support the excellence and innovation of Laureate International Universities network faculty members.
o Open to: Walden faculty members (employed for at least 2 years), who demonstrate a commitment to excellence in teaching and learning, show outstanding success with students and professional respect of peers, and present a compelling research topic on teaching and learning in higher education.
o Award: Varies.
Research Dissemination Support Program
o Intended to support faculty members who promote the visibility and scholarly reputation of Walden University through the dissemination of research and research-related activities conducted by Walden faculty members. This program is managed by the Office of Faculty Research and Sponsored Programs.
o Awards: The presentation award provides $750 travel support for faculty members presenting their research and research-related activities at professional conferences, and the publication award provides $750 to faculty members who publish their research and research-related activities, issued after the research has been published.
External Funding
o The Office of Faculty Research and Sponsored Programs works with individual faculty members to identify external funding opportunities that aligns with their research topics and goals.
o In addition, this office offers faculty members assistance with the development of their research proposals to external funding agencies.
Students
Walden provides all students with a comprehensive Walden University Student Handbook that details expected legal and ethical behavior and related processes, primarily in the section “University Policies and Code of Conduct.”
Through the College of Management and Technology’s School of Management, there is a far more extensive opportunity for students to have a positive impact on social change than many would imagine initially.
• Walden alumni are effecting positive social change. Part of Walden’s mission is to provide a diverse community of career professionals with the opportunity to transform themselves as scholar-practitioners so they can effect positive social change. 66% of Walden alumni reported in a 2011Survey that they had volunteered with organizations, compared with the national average among college graduates of 53% (as reported in the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study of 2008).
• The Walden Service Network, a free, online community that allows Walden students, alumni, faculty members, and staff to promote social change in neighborhoods across the nation and in cities around the world. Members can search for volunteer opportunities, recruit volunteers, and promote events. (See http://www.waldenu.edu/Walden-Difference/38419.htm for more information.) Walden Service Network members also track their time devoted to social change projects through the system.
• An annual Social Change Conference addressing new ways of thinking. (See http://www.waldenu.edu/News-and-Events/21674.htm for more information.)
• Annual Global Day of Service impacting communities worldwide. Walden’s 8th Annual Global Day of Service held on Oct. 6, 2013, spanned 117 events in 27 countries with more than 6,600 participants. (See http://www.waldenu.edu/News-and-Events/32853.htm for more information.)
• An annual “Scholars of Change” video contest for students. Watch the personal stories of Walden students and graduates who demonstrate how a Walden degree is helping them make a positive difference in their lives and the lives of those in their communities. The winner receives a $5,000 award and a donation of $2,500 to the charity of his or her choice. (See http://www.waldenu.edu/About-Us/33393.htm for more information.)
• Students’ have a chance to participate in the annual James McGuire competition to create new business ventures that further promote positive social change.


Scholars of Change
Walden students and potential students are invited to share their work in social change through the Scholars of Change video contest. Walden holds this annual competition to allow students and alumni the opportunity to share their stories of social change widely. Current students and alumni winners receive $2,500, and in 2011, Walden began to award future students with $2,500 scholarships to Walden. All winners also received $2,500 each to donate to their favorite charities. Past Scholars of Change contestants have also participated as panelists presenting their social change stories to students and faculty members at academic residencies. Scholars of Change winners from 2009 and 2010 were:
• Tina Cloney, a Ph.D. in Public Health student from Decatur, Ill., designed a diabetes self-management program for her community; her charity donation went to Millikin University’s Department of Exercise Science and Sport program enhancements.
• Linda Davis, an M.S. in Psychology student from Marco Island, Fla., is empowering young women in Latin America through education; her charity donation will go to Miracles in Action.
• Mary Morrissey‐Ross, a Ph.D. in Public Health student from Fairfield, Conn., implemented screenings to address emerging diabetes and hypertension concerns in Senegal; her charity donation went to Arts‐Are‐Essential.
• Lee Ann Walker, a Doctor of Business Administration student from Jacksonville, Fla., is creating public transportation education campaigns for her community; her charity donation will go to The Women's Center of Jacksonville’s Rape Recovery Team.
• Elisa Watters, a Ph.D. in Public Health student from Poulsbo, Wash., has created sustainable community health education programs in Nepal; her charity donation will go to Children of the Nations.
• Raymond Kayal, a Ph.D. in Management student from Miami, is using his business experience and education to advocate for his city’s homeless; his charity donation will go to Camillus Health Concern, Inc.
• Erin Manzanares, an M.S. in Education student from Abiquiu, N.M., founded a school in one of the poorest counties in the nation; her award will help further advance the La Puerta School for the Arts, Sciences, and Agriculture.
• Keith Smolinski, an Ed.D. student from Woodbridge, Conn., writes original songs to teach students science in accordance with state and national standards; his charity donation will support the American Diabetes Association.
• Melissa Thomas, a Ph.D. in Public Health graduate from Columbus, Ohio, is working to combat health disparities in the Amish and Mennonite communities in the Appalachian region; her charity donation will go to the Ohio Health Research & Innovation Institute.
• Reis Woollen, a Bachelor of Science in Nursing student from Los Gatos, Calif., is helping to train healthcare providers and family members to care for the elderly in India; her charity donation will go to the Silver Inning Foundation in Mumbai, India.

Achievements Research Development in the Field of Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability

A number of Walden’s faculty members research extensively in the area of corporate responsibility and sustainability. Other faculty members have set agendas for researching, presenting, publishing, and developing teaching materials in areas reflecting the PRME Principles. The university supports faculty research by providing a stipend to encourage faculty to publish and present at academic conferences. Listed below are examples of scholarly activities related to sustainability and corporate responsibility:
• 2009: Northern Colorado Conference on Sustainability.
• 2009: Sustainable Opportunities Summit. 4th Annual Conference: Global Sustainability - The New Bottom Line from Denver to Dubai to Delhi.
• Business Ethics, Corporate Responsibility and Firm Value in the Oil and Gas Industry. Society of Petroleum Engineer-Annual Technical Conference-Houston (2004).
• 5th International Conference Design Principles & Practices, Management System Design for Sustainable Excellence: Framework and Methodology [Paper Presentation]. Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, February 2.
• Business as an Agent of World Benefit: Manage by Designing in an Era of Massive Innovation, Leadership System Design for Sustainable Excellence: CEO Perspectives. [Paper, poster and virtual presentation] Case Western University, Cleveland, June 2-5.
• Latham, J. R. (2009). Complex System Design: Creating Sustainable Change in the Mortgage-Finance System [Commentary]. Quality Management Journal, 16 (3), 19-25.
• Latham, J. R. (2009). Leadership System Design for Sustainable Excellence: CEO Perspectives. Academy of Management, Business as an Agent of World Benefit, Manage by Designing in an Era of Massive Innovation.
• Latham, J. R. (2012). Management System Design for Sustainable Excellence: Framework, Practices and Considerations. Quality Management Journal. 19(2), 7-21.
• The Quest for Excellence XXII - Annual Conference, Leading the Journey to Sustainable Excellence: A Leadership System Model [Presentation]. Washington D. C., April 13.
• "Increasing Your Marketability with Your Sustainable Competitive Advantage" Chronicle of Higher Education (Kevin Gazzara, 2010).
• "Using Task Quotient to Achieve Sustainable Organizational Change: Extending the Gallup Q12 Research" Chronicle of Higher Education (Kevin Gazzara, 2010).
• Kirstein, K. D., & Diamond, J. (2011). Inspiring action for sustainable business: A five-phase approach. In K. Kirstein, J. Hinrichs, & S. Olswang (Eds.), Authentic Instruction and Online Delivery: Proven Practices in Higher Education (pp. 115-132). Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Publishing.
• Kirstein, K.D. (2011, November). Inspiring action for sustainable business: A five-phase approach. The International Conference on Education, Research, and Innovation, Madrid, Spain, November 14, 2011.
• Jude Edwards, and Leila A Halawi. Creating a Sustainable E-Commerce Environment. International Journal of Business Research (IJBR), Volume 8, Issue 2, p. 57-71, 2008.
• Leila A. Halawi, Jay E. Aronson, and Richard V. McCarthy. “Knowledge Management and Sustained Competitive Advantage: A Resource-Based View Approach.” Proceedings of the International Conference on Intellectual Capital, Knowledge Management, and Organizational Learning (ICIKM 2004), University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, Oct. 29-30, 2004.
• Fadul, Javier, and Ruth A. Maurer, Sept. 2004, Business Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Firm Value in the Oil and Gas Industry. Society of Petroleum Engineers Transactions. SPE 90701.
• Lentz, C. (2011). The Refractive Thinker®: Vol VII: Social Responsibility. Las Vegas, NV: The Refractive Thinker® Press.
• Roy, M.J. and Thérin, F. (2007), “Knowledge Acquisition and Environmental Commitment in SMEs,” Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management.

University-provided fellowships and grants to support faculty research activity are awarded each year on a competitive basis. These include the following:

Fellowship in Research and Applications for Social Change

The purpose of the Fellowship in Research and Applications for Social Change was to support faculty members and students engaged in research with the potential for social change. It is open to the Walden faculty as well as master’s and doctoral students. The fellowship of up to $10,000 has been awarded annually since 2007.

Recipients include the following:

• 2010: Joanne Souza, who is examining the effects of pharmaceutical advertising on the public.
• 2009: Amy Sickel, NinaNabors, and Jason Seacat (faculty members), who examined the threat of mental health stigma on young adults’ willingness to seek treatment.
• 2008: Denise Alvarado (student), who developed a culturally appropriate quality-of-life instrument for use among Native American populations—the Native American Wellness Scale or (NAWS). The scale provides information vital to planning interventions, allocating resources, and providing services to these populations.
• 2007: Anita M. Cassard (student), who examined current business practices that reflect the Sherpa model of leadership, where someone (in this case, women in business) successfully leads an enterprise to the summit but then steps aside to let others claim the top.

Research Fellowship in Distance Education
o Supports research endeavors that contribute both theoretical and applied knowledge to the growing field of distance education; encourages research conducted in the name of the university and continuous improvement in the distance-education programs at Walden.
o Open to: Walden faculty members (employed for at least 2 years) and master’s and doctoral students.
o Award: Up to $10,000.
Fellowship in Research and Applications for Social Change
o Established to enable members of the Walden community to make a significant and meaningful change in academic and social communities, both locally and globally.
o Open to: Walden faculty members (employed for at least 2 years) and master’s and doctoral students.
o Award: Up to $10,000.
Faculty Research Initiative Grant Program
o Established to support excellence in scholarly work by providing funding for selected faculty research projects deemed to be of exceptional merit and is intended to provide “seed money” for the development of faculty research agendas. This program’s funds can be used to support pilot research projects and small-scale research studies and to supplement new areas of investigation that are spin-off studies or sub-studies of larger ongoing research projects.
o Open to: Walden faculty members (employed for at least 6 months).
o Award: Varies.
The David A. Wilson Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
o Seeks to recognize and support the excellence and innovation of Laureate International Universities network faculty members.
o Open to: Walden faculty members (employed for at least two years), demonstrate a commitment to excellence in teaching and learning, show outstanding success with students and professional respect of peers, and present a compelling research topic on teaching and learning in higher education.
o Award: Varies.
Research Dissemination Support Program
o Intended to support faculty members who promote the visibility and scholarly reputation of Walden University through the dissemination of research and research-related activities conducted by Walden faculty members. This program is managed by the Office of Faculty Research and Sponsored Programs.
o Awards: The presentation award provides $750 travel support for faculty members presenting their research and research-related activities at professional conferences and the publication award provides $750 to faculty members who publish their research and research-related activities, issued after the research has been published.
o Below are examples of Research Dissemination Grants provided in 2013 and 2012-

• Barclay, K. B. (2013, June). Solutions focus: A positive approach to coaching and change. Poster session presented at the Third World Congress on Positive Psychology, Los Angeles, California, USA.
• Chien, W., & Mayer, R. (2013, August). How Urban Hospitals’ Mission and Cost Structure Affects Patients’ Perception of Quality. Paper presented at the American Accounting Association Annual Meeting, Anaheim, California, USA.
• Ferreira, G. (2012). Evaluating the implementation of communities of practice in global organizations. Paper presented at the Institutional Behavioral Applied Management Conference (IBAM), Nashville, Tennessee.
• Hamzaee, Reza G. (2012, May). An International Empirical-Policy Approach to Economic Growth and Unemployment. Paper presented at EBES 2012 Conference, Istanbul, Turkey.
• Levasseur, R. E. (2012). People skills: Leading virtual teams—a change management perspective. Interfaces, 42(2), 213-216. doi:10.1287/inte.1120.0634
• Love, V. D. & Diala, I. S. (2012). Cultural, informational and technological based knowledge management. International Journal of computer Applications and Technology, 1, (1).
• Nirenberg, J. (2013). Exploring well-being at work: The missing piece in Bhutan’s concept of GNH (Gross National Happiness). Interconnections (9) pp. 19 – 25. website: http://www.anglia.ac.uk/ruskin/en/home/faculties/aibs/research/interconnections/issues.html
• Nirenberg, J. (2012, July). Affordable, accessible, and recognized: The next frontier in educating public service, non-governmental (NGO) and other civil society organization (CSO) professionals. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association of Schools and Institutes of Administration (in association with the International Institute of Administrative Sciences), Bangkok, Thailand.
• Shaikh, F.K., Zeadally, S., Siddiqui, F. (2013). Energy Efficient Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks. In Next-Generation Wireless Technologies (pp 131 - 157). Springer-Verlag, London. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4471-5164-7_8

External Funding
o The Office of Faculty Research and Sponsored Programs works with individual faculty members to identify external funding opportunities that aligns with their research topics and goals.
o In addition, this office offers faculty members assistance with the development of their research proposals to external funding agencies.
Examples of alumni activities related to sustainability and social change are profiled at http://www.waldenu.edu/about/newsroom/publications.
Walden alumni are effecting positive social change. Part of Walden’s mission is to provide a diverse community of career professionals with the opportunity to transform themselves as scholar-practitioners so they can effect positive social change. According to the 2013 Walden Alumni Survey, more than three of four Walden alumni report that Walden has helped them effect social change inside or outside of their profession to a very great, great, or moderate extent and that Walden alumni also have a 68% average rate of volunteerism of those responding, compared with the national average among college graduates of 50%.
In addition, the School of Management promotes student, faculty, and staff engagement in related Walden university-wide initiatives, such as the Walden Service Network, the Annual Social Change Conference, and the Scholars of Change video contest.
Walden also sponsors an annual Global Day of Service impacting communities worldwide. Walden’s 8th Annual Global Day of Service was held on Oct. 6, 2013, and spanned 117 events in 27 countries with more than 6,600 participants. Examples of specific efforts included:
• Preparing meals for the homeless.
• Sprucing up public school classrooms and playgrounds.
• Staffing and stocking community food pantries.
• Working side-by-side with teens developing workforce readiness and life skills.
• Cleaning local animal shelters in the U.S.
• Refurbishing a community center for Native American teens.
• Making care packages and gifts for sick children at the Ronald McDonald House and safety kits for children with autism.
• Assisting with craft projects and activities in senior centers.
• Mentoring students in Ghana and assisting with health services at a school in Nigeria.
• Recruiting family and friends to join them in dozens of other local volunteer projects around the world.

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